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  1. #1
    StarCraft: Brood War Benutzerbild von DonGeckone
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    Snooker Fantasy 18/19




    Disclaimer

    In order to attract a ton of new participants the topic is hosted in English again. Once we successfully bullied people away we'll probably switch back to DEUTSCH.

    About

    Snooker Fantasy is a free forum game for any user registered in this forum. Its goal is to have fun while watching snooker in the upcoming 2018/2019 season. There are no prizes, but glory for the winner. As is tradition, this season will start with great ambition only to be forgotten about once I lost interest in updating the score sheet six or seven months in, as it's becoming ever clearer that I'll end up second for the umpteenth time in a row, which is beginning to annoy me.


    Posts




    History

    S1 Winner: Piko (Runner-Up: Gecko)
    S2 Winner: Foo-Rear (Runner-Up: Gecko)
    S3 Winner: Endrox (Runner-Up: Gecko)
    S4 Winner: Foo-Rear (Runner-Up: Gecko)

    Brulu 9-Ball Memorial '18 (in Bamberg): Syrian Refugee (Runner-Up: Russian Migrant)


    Useful Links

    Geändert von DonGeckone (26. Juni 2018 um 09:50 Uhr)
    Zitat Zitat von Annihilator Beitrag anzeigen
    Was macht Gecko da aus meiner BWCL. https://i.imgur.com/Dnql4wd.gif


  2. #2
    StarCraft: Brood War Benutzerbild von DonGeckone
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    Standings on Google Drive
    (the header is a link!)

    The idea of a fantasy league is somewhat easy to understand: before the official start of any season the professional players are ranked according to several factors of their performance in the past snooker season. Factors that play into the evaluation (ranking) of the players are explained shortly.

    Each participant in the fantasy league starts out with two point pools, one for the "professional team" (pro team) and one for the anti team. For the pro-team any participant has to buy five players and three for his anti team. The points scored by the pro team will be added to the participant's overall score, while the points gathered by the anti team will be subtracted. Obviously any participant's goal is to form a pro team that does very well, while his anti team should do as badly as possible in the upcoming snooker season.


    Player Evaluation

    Players were ranked according to several lists and finishes, most important were:

    • World Ranking: This list ranks players according to prize money earned for "Full Ranking Tournaments" (no invitationals!) in the previous two years. Points earned for Fantasy League:
      • Top 8: 5 Points
      • Top 9 - 16: 4 Points
      • Top 17 - 32: 3 Points
    • One Year Ranking: Same as above, however only listing player's earnings in the previous year. This list is a more accurate description of a player's form at the end of the 2017/2018 season. Points earned:
      • Top 1 - 32: 1 Point
    • PTC Ranking: Prize money earned by a player in the 2017/2018 tournament in smaller tournaments, such as the Paul Hunter Classics or the Gibraltar Open. This is ranking gives an idea which player did well in short best-of-distances:
      • Top 1 - 8: 2 Points
      • Top 9 - 16: 1 Point
    • Grand Prix Ranking: Similar to the one year ranking, the GP-Ranking lists the prize money of players until mid-season (when the Grand Prix takes place):
      • Top 1 - 32: 1 Point
    • Tripple Crown Titles: The 'Tripple Crown' tournaments are the most prestigeous and most important tournaments for most professionals. Any won title gives +2 Points to a player's worth. The titles are the World Championship, the UK Championship (often described as the hardest arena other than the WC, due to long distances and having to play 8+ rounds to lift the trophy) and the Masters, for which only the best 16 players are invited (only non-ranking tournament of the tripple crown title). Since it's nearly impossible to hold all three titles in an ongoing season (done so by Higgins, MJ Williams, o'Sullivan, Stephen Hendry and Steve Davis), the title "Tripple Crown" is used.
    • Major Titles: Any title valued with more than 125.000 Pounds for the winner earned another 2 points, due to those tournaments usually featuring longer rounds and hard competition.
    • Other Titles: Any other tournament win got the winner a +1 point, regardless of the title being a full ranking list tournament or some form of invitational or using altered snooker rules (Shoot Out, 6 Reds WC). The World's senior's and the women's circuit aren't calculated, also no amateur tournaments.


    Note: If a player wins a tournament in the upcoming 2018/2019 season, he will gain +1 point in the evaluation. In other words, the ranking will be continously updated.


    Scoring Points

    Most tournamenst are tracked during the ongoing season (2018/2019). This does include all full ranking events (events recognized by the WPBSA/worldsnooker as basis for their world ranking), as well as invitationals (Masters, Wuxi Classic, Championship League) and other non-ranking tournaments (e.g. 6 Reds Championship). Any event with a higher attendence of professionals (those listed in the world ranking) goes in, amateur events and events exclusively for women or seniors are ignored.

    Depending on how a player performs, points can be gained as follows:

    Regular Points

    • Match Won: +1 Point
    • Match Won via White wash (4-0 or higher): +2 points
    • Match Won with six frames advance: +2 points
    • Tournament won: +2 points
    • Lost in first round: -2 points
    • lost via White wash: -2 points
    • lost with six frames behind: -2 points


    Bonus Points

    • 4 Centuries scored within one match: +2 points
    • Scored highest break of the event: +2 points (qualifiers may give the same bonus if they are hosted before the actual tournament)
    • 5 Centuries scored within one tournament: +5 points
    • Maximum break is scored (147 points): +2 points (on top of highest break, so a total of +4)
    • Consecutive titles (player wins two or more tournaments in a row): +5 points



    Building a Team

    The most basic strategy for any participant should be to form a team of top scorers for the professional team and players expected to do badly during the season for the anti team. However, a closer look at the point scheme is advised, as a player winning a tournament might gather fewer points than a player only reaching the semi finals, but playing strongly until then (e.g. defeating his opponents 4-0, 4-0, 4-0, scoring five centuries and the highest break). Consistency matters.

    The pro team has to consist of five players, for which any participant can once spent 30 points. Fewer points are ok, but the 30 points might not be exceeded.
    The anti team has to consist of three players, for which any participant has to spent at least 15 points. More points are ok.


    To sign up for this league, simply post your team in this topic and it will eventually be added to the Google Drive Overview in the first post.

    The post of the team can be changed, but will be fixed once the first qualifiers start (right now: 2nd July, Qualifier Riga Masters).



    Transfers

    In the ongoing season any participant can transfer players. However, this does also mean that he has to pay a one-time transfer fee of 2 points from his overall score. The scores of the new player will only be factored in, once the transfer was done. Transfers can only be done in between tournaments, not during an ongoing event.

    Players can be bought according to their evaluation. A new player recruited for the professional team has to have a lower evaluation than the player he replaces. Vice versa, a new player recruited for the anti team has to have a higher score than the player he replaces.

    Examples:

    Pro Team Transfer:

    Ding Junhui (evaluation: 11 points) can replace John Higgins (evaluation: 12 points)
    John Higgins (12) can not replace Ding Junhui (11)

    Anti Team Transfer:

    Tom Ford (4) can replace Tom Ford (3), but not the other way round.

    That being said: don't hesitate to sign up (and explain your picks in the post!).
    Geändert von DonGeckone (31. Mai 2018 um 18:27 Uhr)
    Zitat Zitat von Annihilator Beitrag anzeigen
    Was macht Gecko da aus meiner BWCL. https://i.imgur.com/Dnql4wd.gif

  3. #3
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    Tippspielmeister Snooker Fantasy 2014
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    Prediction for the new season:
    Runner-up: Gecko

    beer gives power
    #bärenhöhle

    ballern

  4. #4
    StarCraft: Brood War Benutzerbild von DonGeckone
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    Q-School Tournaments over

    Ever since Barry Hearn took over a leading role in the snooker world, the system of tournaments changed. A part of his doing was to re-evaluate the world rankings. In the past, the rankings was based on points, which got replaced by prize money. On first glimpse, this didn't make much of a difference. However, since Hearn was able to include more tournaments with a lower prize pool, the old classification of "full ranking tournament" started to fade and got replaced so that eventually most tournaments started being "professional tournaments" instead.

    To clarify: About five years ago (don't critize me if I got the dates wrong), a number of small tournaments, mostly hosted in continental Europe and Asia, were available for professionals and called "Players Tour Championship Tournaments" (PTC Tournaments). Those weren't "full ranking" events, yet their prize money was factored into the world ranking now. The reason for those not being "full ranking" was in their open system: anyone could qualify, amateurs of both genders and of any age, as long as they were registered with worldsnooker.

    Back to the system. Everyone listed in the official world ranking is a "professional" player, therefore the prize money for amateurs is not factored in, nor are they shown in the rankings, despite some amateurs being able to overtake the lowest ranked pros. Yet, the status as professional is not eternal, a player can lose a "card" (professional status) to the tour easily. This happens when the player drops out of the Top 64 of the world ranking AND his original card ran "out of time". Usually cards allow a professional to play on for two seasons with some exceptions (one year cards are given as invitational to amateurs with great record in the past, or high finishes / wins in big amateur events).

    All in all there are mostly about 140 - 150 licensed professionals, even so some do not play anymore (e.g. Stephen Hendry, record seven time World Champion with a permanent card to honour his achievements).

    The Q-School

    The Q-School is one way for any amateur to earn a two year card for the upcoming season. Any player can, after paying a fee (iirc something around 1.000 pounds), enter three tournaments. If he makes it to the Semi Finals, he gets a tour card. This sounds easy, but is usually a futile task for even the best amateurs, as will be shown in a bit.

    This years winners are:


    Tournament 1
    Jak Jones
    Sam Baird
    Hammad Miah
    Sam Craigie

    All of the players were already professionals when they entered the tournament, but faced the loss of their card due to them finishing outside of the Top 64. Jones and Craigie were some more faceless players for now, they never really went farther than the odd Top32 placement in bigger tours.

    Miah is probably one of the lesser known players, he has been on the tour for two years now and struggled to qualify, probably due to a lack of experience in professional environment. His type of play can best be described as on/off - he certainly can produce a high level of play, but often breaks down against players he should be able to beat. That he qualified comes as no surprise.

    Sam Baird is probably the best known player of the four. Only two years ago he was able to best the Top16 on occasions and was regularly seen in the later stages of ranking tournaments. His slump in the previous season threatened his survival, but there was no doubt he'd smash one of the three Q-School tournaments. Great to see him back, really.


    Tournament 2

    Jordan Brown
    Craig Steadman
    Lu Ning
    Zhao Xintong

    Again, no real surprises here. Brown apparently was one of the strongest amateurs for years now, same goes for the Chinese Ning, who - iirc - already was a pro not too long ago. Steadman also belongs to those professionals who rarely make big things happen, but beat amateurs with ease.

    The most popular name in this edition was Zhao Xintong, former amateur teen World Champion and one of the great talents of the game. His break building is incredible and very entertaining, due to his speed around the table. An average shot time of less than 20 seconds puts him in the same class as a Judd Trump or a o'Sullivan. Yet, experience is missing, for the teenager. Probably the youngest face of the upcoming season.

    Tournament 3

    Thor Chuang Leong
    Kishan Hirani
    Andy Lee
    Ashley Carty

    Leong, again, is one of those established lower class professionals, no surprise. Hirani and Lee are somewhat surprising, yet both amateurs apparently have good track records.

    The 'notable' player in my opinion here is Carty - a player with a furious style and great ability, yet one of those characters with shaky form: Do or die through an entire match. You can witness greatness, but also total black outs.

    Notable Drop Outs

    Mitchel Mann

    Easily the most prominent player to miss to qualify. Mann is, similar to Baird, one of the professionals you'd probably search somewhere in between #32 and #64 of the world. Especially during the PTC-era Mann was able to go as far as the semi finals quite often, most times beating the established elite along the way before eventually breaking in. How he could not win a q-tour is beyond me.

    David Grace

    Even more surprisingly than Mann: Grace has been a part of the tour for more than ten years and had his ups and downs - but never such a big slump as today. Only two years ago he could've made it to the crucible final stages, but now? What happened?


    Reanne Evans / Ng On Yee

    This duo decided the women's world championship for the past decade (at least it feels this way), yet both couldn't come close to actually qualifying. Especially in Evans' case this is a bit surprising, she really does know her way around the table.

    Jamie Cope

    Another tragic story of snooker - about ten years ago seen as one of the prodigys and mainting rankings close or even within the Top 16. Now he has serious problems to get his tour card back - this time he missed it.

    There are dozends of other professionals missing to qualify, e.g. Chen Zhe, Alex Borg, Jamie Curtis-Barrett, or ex-professionals like Fraser Patrick, Cahill, Andy Hicks, Barry Pinches and Fang Xiongman, not to mention amateurs like Casey, Lilley or Sargeant, who already kept knocking on the doors in the PTC series (in some cases with quarter final appearances!).



    Changes: Challenge Tours

    The rest of the "Q-School Order of Merit" (Q-School ranking) will be used during the ongoing season.

    First off, there are apparently tournaments ("challenge tours") being hosted, from which the two finalists can win 2-year-cards. The first tour starts in a few days, and it'll be interesting to see who'll win.

    Secondly, if there are professionals dropping out of open tournaments, the Q-School order of Merit will replace the drop outs. This might be huge for some, but I honestly can't see many of the faces go farther than round 1 at most.


    Interesting Invite: Stefanow

    Apparently Worldsnooker tries to appeal to continental Europe and gave out an invite tour card for Polish Stefanow. To be fair, Stefanow has shown his talent time and time again, not only in amateur arenas, but also in PTC events. He for sure is one of the greater talents among the amateurs, but for me personally, an invite still is a bit of a surprise. A nice one.
    Zitat Zitat von Annihilator Beitrag anzeigen
    Was macht Gecko da aus meiner BWCL. https://i.imgur.com/Dnql4wd.gif

  5. #5
    StarCraft: Brood War Benutzerbild von DonGeckone
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    Player Profiles, Part I: The Top 8


    In an effort to increase the value of this topic and futile attempt to increase the non-existent discussion, here’s my take on the Top 8 of the Snooker Fantasy Players. Please note, this is not the current world ranking Top 8, as it’s mainly a made up analysis for this league, similar to the power rankings of Korean Brood War pros on Teamliquid, not some form of article series about snooker in general.


    #1 Ronnie o’Sullivan

    What can be said about the wunderkind of snooker, that wasn’t already repeated ten thousand times elsewhere? Hate him or love him, o’Sullivan is the main reason snooker is so popular for non-snooker enthusiasts, as his antics loosen the atmosphere for people not familiar with the strict codes and regulations that make the game seem so boring on first glimpse. Anyhow.

    Despite claiming he would quit snooker forever a couple of times, o’Sullivan made an effort to come back in full form and re-take his spot as leader of the snooker world last season. In the previous year the English player made efforts to get his temperament under control and most certainly improved in this aspect of his game. His break downs seemed to disappear and he more often made use of his B-play, rather than giving up and frown at the balls, until he’d eventually lose to an underperforming opponent. This, his Achille’s heel, was the main reason players like Selby could overthrow him in the past.

    As result, o’Sullivan became the fifth player in history to take fife trophies in one season – the other ones being Stephen Hendry, Ding Junhui, Mark Selby and someone I have forgotten (Murphy?). Even though the number of tournaments increased and this record is nothing like Hendry’s dominance in the 90es, it’s still a mile stone he can be proud of. He also overtook Steve Davis and later John Higgins in terms of “ranking tournaments won” – now he closes in on the magical 36 trophies of Stephen Hendry.

    Among the tournaments o’Sullivan took were several high class events, most memorable though: The UK Championships, one of the prestigious triple crown trophies.

    To be perfectly fair: Sullivan never truly won “in style”, most of his opponents were tired and made use of their B or even C-games. Yet, it does take a lot of skill to take down the elite class five times, while scoring still more than fifty centuries.

    As for the cost/benefit ratio goes: I’m not certain it’s wise to purchase a 16 point player ever, regardless of finishes. In Sullivan cases this seems even more stupid, as Sullivan never enters all tournaments, but focusses his energy on the top level arenas, such as the tripple crown venues. However, you can be sure he will be one player to take all potential bonus points – tour won, centuries and so on, possibly one or two maximums along the way.


    #2 Mark J Williams

    Another titan oft he scene and the winner of the single handedly greatest crucible final of the new century. It was a miracle that Williams not only qualified via ranking points for the last WC, given that he couldn’t even qualify in 2016; yet he made it through the grid and played better and better as the tournament progressed, ending in an extreme show of what can be done if you have nerves of steel – his final break will certainly go down in history and will have a top 10 place of my snooker memories forever.

    Regardless, Williams also won three other tournaments, coming close to the “five tournament” record, if you would count the 6-Reds World Championship as ranking title (which it should be in this case). Aside from that, Williams broke through the Top16 barrier in no time, as he steadily gathered momentum and rarely dropped out before the quarter finals. A great season for a great sportsman and a legend of the game.

    As player he’d be worth looking at if he would be around the 12 point margin – he plays everything, he finishes high, he scores centuries and is known to white wash quite some players on his way. Yet, 14 points are a risky investment, it’s never a certainty what happens with a player who won the World Championships.

    #3 Mark Selby

    The everlasting world number one took two major titles in the past year – both the international championship and the china open. Aside from that, he did so-so, but finished in the top 4 of the “one year ranking” and scored heavily with more than fifty centuries.
    For any professional such a track record is an all-time high and the best they can hope for. For Selby this was the worst year of the past five years, as he underperformed to put it mildly. According to Steve Davis, this year will determine how Selby will do for the rest of his career: A bad season is a given, even for an outlier in the world of the greatest talents. If he can recover, it might be the start of another three or more years of Selby dominance. It might also be what happened to Mark J Williams after his second world championship win: a ten year slump with lots of pressure to come back from the dead.

    Being worth 13 points Selby seems a bit of a gamble. If he recovers and delivers another 2016-like season, he’ll be fully worth it. 50+ centuries during the season can be expected, as well as all-time entries and a ton of trophies, including being a major favourite in anything, regardless of venue or opponent. Even if it doesn’t play out, 13 point players can be swapped for other players via transfer potentially.

    #4 John Higgins

    The scot, ranked third in the all-time list after Hendry and Sullivan, did very well himself. He is the “well, what now?” to anyone claiming seniors can’t dominate. Three titles and being runner-up in the World Championships for a second year silence all doubts of what this player is capable of. Also, the energy and commitment to the sport is non comparable – the only player to come close to Higgins might be Selby’s attitude.

    As for an analysis: John Higgins is one of the players who could lead any pro-team. He will certainly not do badly, it’s Higgins – the man is pure discipline in any situation. He’ll enter every tour and never fail hard. He’ll also stomp people not giving their best, and in most cases, even those who show their greatest performance. To quote Hendry: “Usually, you want to be in front with two or three frames, against John Higgins you don’t want to lead and have him start a come back, no matter what cost”.

    #5 Ding Junhui

    The Chinese Dragon is the silent player in the background and has been for years. If you look at his record, it’ll become clear that he is one of the greatest of all times. He didn’t do well last season on first glimpse, then you’ll realize he barely played but still managed to snatch a major title. That’s the beauty of Ding – if he shows, he shows good results, he rarely fails and never fails too hard. Yet, he shows nerves on occasion.

    As part of the Pro team Ding is always a bit of a gamble. He can easily produce five tournaments won, there’s no opponent he can’t beat – the problem is that Ding rarely plays so much and prepares for special venues. I really have a hard time judging this character.

    #6 Judd Trump

    Judd Trump had a somewhat good season, as he won a trophy. Trump entered almost all venues and showed good performances, but never seemed to have the drive to win as much as possible, rather than just maintaining his place among the absolute elite. Along the way he rarely exploded and showed that he could easily be the next leader of his generation; as tragic as it sounds, the matches he showed his absolute best are the ones I remember him being defeated harshly, especially when facing John Higgins.
    Trump is a solid pick for any pro-team, as he usually never gets torn apart in the first round and wins his matches. He gets a lot of white washes, is a candidate for “highest break”, as well as maximums and tournament wins.

    #7 Shaun Murphy

    This one is particularly surprising. He is a steady player, but he fails to show his class for a few years now. He is good enough to never drop out early and hand out a few white washes, but seemed to have lost his way when it comes to explosions during major events and against the leading players. Yet, he never falls down, never gets demotivated and is a player to count on. Last year he made back-to-back appearances in finals of minor tours and eventually won a trophy of his own.

    With ten points, Murphy is worth to be considered as part of a team, yet I’m not sure if so many points should be focused on Murphy alone – he does not do crazy things often enough to justify the cost/benefit ratio.

    #8 Ryan Day

    A player who finally won his first trophies last year – not one, but three, two of them within 14 days against the absolute best this game has to offer. Day has been one of the players to tragically lose any finals and never win, yet, last year he overcame that and it showed in the Fantasy rankings: tons of won matches, white washes and centuries.

    However, hard to say if he can reproduce this kind of form a second year in a row. Looking at his record: Day was never a bad investment, not a high risk, but back then his evaluation was in between 3 and 6 points, depending on the year. This time he is worth ten, and with that should be one of the absolute “stars” of any team. Is that a sound investment? I’m not entirely convinced.
    Zitat Zitat von Annihilator Beitrag anzeigen
    Was macht Gecko da aus meiner BWCL. https://i.imgur.com/Dnql4wd.gif

  6. #6
    Tippspielmeister Snooker Fantasy 2017
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    Vielleicht mach ich ja auch wieder mit, auch wenn immer der selbe 2ter wird.
    beer gives power


    Zitat Zitat von Bootdiskette Beitrag anzeigen
    ich hab grad ernsthaft zwei sekunden lang versucht mit dem mauszeiger vom monitor bis runter auf die tastatur zu fahren um auf f5 zu klicken.

  7. #7
    Tippspielmeister Snooker Fantasy 2015
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    Zitat Zitat von DonGeckone Beitrag anzeigen
    (and explain your picks in the post!).
    Alright, but don't assume it's gonna make sense, since I don't actually watch snooker. I'm assuming all the dudes who aren't in the list right now are 0's, due to Q school.

    Ronnie O'Sullivan 16 too much of a risk, and 16 points is way too much anyway, considering he had a fairly good season and Trump is available for 2/3
    Mark J Williams 14 too much of a risk, when the laz0r cue placebo thing wears off, homeostasis is gonna get his ass
    Mark Selby 13 certainly worth the points if he has a good season, which is fairly likely
    John Higgins 12 the solid 7 of snooker fantasy
    Ding Junhui 11 I am going to ignore Ding Junhui
    Judd Trump 10 good value, even though I hate picking the little shit every time
    Shaun Murphy 10 lmao
    Ryan Day 10 too many points for my favorite shape shifter
    Neil Robertson 9 yes no yes no maybe
    Mark Allen 9 too many up and downs for really high performance over a complete season
    Luca Brecel 9 no
    Kyren Wilson 8 he was doing well. maybe.
    Anthony McGill 7 he's fairly solid overall, but if you want to win, there's really no point in picking him, there are just better options
    Graeme Dott 6 strong contender for contra
    Barry Hawkins 6 kind of a steal for 6 points
    Allister Carter 6 solid pick, certainly has the potential to win a tournament, but can't see him crush a complete season
    Stuart Bingham 6 very much worth considering
    Stephen Maguire 6 same as Carter
    Yan Bingtao 6 really hard to pick with Hawk and Bing there
    Michael White 6 lmao
    Joe Perry 5 solid pick, but not enough potential
    Martin Gould 5 points are pretty bang on for the risk reward
    Xiao Guodong 5 there are better options
    Jack Lisowski 5 too risky
    David B Gilbert 5
    Ricky Walden 5 same as Gould
    Mark King 4
    Tom Ford 4
    Marco Fu 3 might fall through, but he signed up for laser tag, for 3 could certainly be worth it
    Liang Wenbo 3 good bang for the buck
    Anthony Hamilton 3
    Michael Holt 3
    Cao Yupeng 2 $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
    Li Hang 2
    Jimmy Robertson 2
    Michael Georgiou 2
    Robert Milkins 2
    Mark Joyce 1
    Lü Haotian 1

    possible 0ers
    Yuelong, Woollaston

    Dudes I might want no homo:
    Selby 13 best butt eu
    Higgins 12
    Trump 10
    Robertson 9
    Wilson 8
    Hawkins 6
    Bingham 6
    Fu 3
    Wenbo 3
    Yupeng 2
    Woollaston 0
    Yuelong 0




    Trump 10
    Wilson 8
    Hawkins 6
    Bingham 6
    Yuelong 0


    Brecel 9
    White 6
    Basem Eltahhan 0
    Geändert von Reary McFooface (28. Juni 2018 um 15:17 Uhr)

  8. #8
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    Pro tip of the day: Never create a full chinese team. Never.

    I'll add my team later.
    beer gives power
    #bärenhöhle

    ballern

  9. #9
    Tippspielmeister Snooker Fantasy 2017
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    Dann hau ich auch mal mein Schmarrn raus.


    Mark Selby 13
    Kyren Wilson 8
    Jack Lisowski 5
    Liang Wenbo 3
    Lü Haotian 1


    Michael White 6
    Ricky Walden 5
    Mark King 4
    beer gives power


    Zitat Zitat von Bootdiskette Beitrag anzeigen
    ich hab grad ernsthaft zwei sekunden lang versucht mit dem mauszeiger vom monitor bis runter auf die tastatur zu fahren um auf f5 zu klicken.

  10. #10
    StarCraft: Brood War Benutzerbild von DonGeckone
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    Player Profiles, Part II: The rest of the Top16


    #9 Neil Robertson

    When Robertson took his World Title, he did in style and it looked as if it was the Aussie who'd be the leader of the next generation, leaving the likes of Ding, Murphy, Maguire and Selby behind. Turns out that the 'Tunder of Down Under' never really did badly, but struggled from several issues, one being a self claimed addiction to computer games. He is indeed known to tweet about Hearthstone and other games in an ongoing season, as well as testing out what happens if you sit out the smaller tournaments, as showcased during the PTC Season. The result: an odd title here and there, but not the killing spree one suspects when looking at the outstanding records Roberts had (including more than 100 centuries in a single season).

    Actually, the past two seasons were what could be described as poor shows from the Australian. At one point he fell out of the Top16 for the first time in a decade and nearly missed to be qualify for the Ally Pally and the Masters. Yet, he made it. But not much else. Right now, Robertson is a wild card, especially when it comes to forming an anti-team. However, it is also known that Robertson can score incredibly well if he feels like it.

    #10 Mark Allen

    Similar to Ryan Day Mark Allen is one of the all-time great "talents who never win", except he won a couple of tournaments, including last year's Masters. And boy did he show what he is capable off if his cue action doesn't fail during a tournament. In theory, there is no player he has to fear, as his offense is incredibly strong, stronger than most professional's can dream of. However, being worth 9 points is a bit on the heavy side, as Allen is known to struggle with his mental fortitude in the ongoing season and has the tendency to suffer from overboiling emotions and phases in which motivation seems to miss. I'd really love to see him actually dominate a few tournaments within one season instead of picking up a title each two years. It's highly unlikely that he'll go into overdrive.

    #11 Luca Brecel

    I'm way too lazy to look up when and how Brecel started as professional, but one thing is clear: He is argueably one of the most talented players to have ever lifted a cue, as shown as scoring a maximum break before he turned 15. However, it took the European a very, very long time to translate his raw skill into professional dominance around the table when faced with regular professionals. While he didn't have much problems maintaining a spot within the Top64 it seemed to take him forever to break into the leading circle. In the past two years he came to terms and lifted a trophy, which he won after defeating a number of the all-time greats.

    Only, he seems to be overwhelmed with the sudden change in status - he is no more a talented youngster, but the face of the continental snooker players with aspirations to undermine Great Britain's everlasting grasp on the professional circuit, all while also being a high seed now.

    #12 Kyren Wilson

    Wilson has similarities to Selby when it comes to the way he became a 'star'. It took him a lot of attempts and very hard training to be placed within the Top 16 of the world. Meanwhile his allround play, safeties and offensive long potting in combination with top notch break building, improved greatly over the last two years. But it's not any of that, which enables the Welsh to actually reach finals over and over again, it's the sheer will to become one of the all-time greats, to be mentioned in the same breath than o'Sullivan, Higgins, Williams or Selby. The kid's not done yet and he'll most likely storm towards the finals of every tournament, no matter the costs. Definitely one of the players to look out for, as he really never dares to rely on raw talent alone.

    #13 Anthony McGill

    In direct comparison to any other player of the Top32 the question remains: why is he where he is? I can't possibly answer that, simply by looking which opposition he faced in which tournaments, the answer probably always boils down to: McGill's strength is pure and never failing form in the early stages of a tournament. Similar to the hard training players, McGill never relys on his form and never gives up, it's pure mental strength. Yet, that's not backed up by any other quality the aforementioned players share, at least it seems to me like it. Of course, he's an outstanding player, but... I can honestly not see how he will defend his spot among the Top16 once his seeding bonus starts to fade and he can't help but to face the big names early on, like the rest of the Top32 do. The others around him are simply too strong. Obviously, McGill will prove me wrong during the season, but anyway ;(

    #14 Graeme Dott

    Dott is one of those players that are missed easily. His high seeding in the Fantasy League comes from his incredible play during January and February 2018, in which he made back-to-back finals, just to lose both, most memorably being utterly destroyed by MJW in Berlin. Regardless, Dott showed that he is one of the all-time professionals, the kind of player that simply understands how to stand your ground against the best of the best. At the same time, Dott is also known to not do the kind of things a player needs in order to be a good investment in this fantasy league - rarely more than five centuries in a tournament, not mentioning his tendency to grind his opponents instead of wiping the floor with them.

    #15 Barry Hawkins

    The poor loser of last year's Semi Final against MJW in the WC. Before that, his season was utter shit and that's what the ranking shows. Yet, this can be explained by the fact that he suffered from a death of a close family member during the season. It's understandable that a player of his class suddenly starts to play badly. I neither see him play over the top next year, nor do I see him to fail hard. He'll probably deliver around 40 century breaks during the season, will show up in at least one semi final and will qualify for all relevant tournaments - Championship's Final Group, Masters, 6 Red beyond Group, Grand Prix and PTC Finals. Does that make him a good investment though?

    #16 Ali Carter

    The definition of a fighter - beat cancer, not once but twice, regularly plays like a young god, despite suffering from Morbus Crohn and doesn't give a shit who he faces, as showcased when he took down o'Sullivan in last year's WC with ease, while not being affected by the usual dramaqueen incidents that simply had to happen. I really do love him both as player and as walking advertisment for the sport - T H E gentleman - but I have a hard time to judge if he's a worthy addition to a team. While Carter indeed is a fighter and almost all that was just written about Hawkins applies: Carter right now isn't outclassing the opposition, so he'd be more likely an addition, rather than a leading player.
    Zitat Zitat von Annihilator Beitrag anzeigen
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  11. #11
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    Player Profiles: Top 39

    As for the rest of the ranking goes, a few selected picks of the Top 39, in order of points.

    Stephen Maguire

    Maguire, the fallen wunderkind of Scotland, the promised prince and heir to Hendry's throne, does quite well. Wellish, more like. I love following him in any tournament, it never seizes to amaze me to see him destroying opponents, regardless of their reputation or skill. Whenever Maguire goes blank and switches to his professional mode, his approach to snooker, the way he breaks the balls and his unique technique, are a form of art. Sadly, Maguire doesn't do that too often and this is the single reason he never caught up with his rivals Robertson and Murphy. A tragedy really, this is a player who had everything he needed, until a slump had hit him.
    Anyway, Maguire always was a very smart pick, as he often snatched bonus points along the way. This season he is a bit of a wild card, especially since 6 points aren't as cheap as the usual 5 or even 3 points of the past years. Not sure, not sure.


    Yan Bingtao

    Very China, much wow. This kid was close to do a full Ding Junhui on the tour, when he was as close as one frame to creating a new world record: lifting a title as youngest player ever. The rest of the season wasn't exactly horrible to him either, he beat more than just a couple of the high rollers, stomping veterans left and right. Yet. This is China.

    On a smaller scale similar super-records have been spotted with Xiao Guodong and Liang Wenbo in their first season, then followed by Zhao Yuelong and the killing spree Zhao Xintong was on when competing in the U16/U18/U21 amateur events. It seems whenever the Chinese support a youngster - last season it appeared to be Xintong - another Chinese says "fuck it" and overtakes him by a mile.

    However, the story goes like this: The Chinese dark horse enters a tournament, or several tournaments, goes out with a blow and then sinks into a whole, sinks down some more and either is never seen again (Xiongman, Pengfei) or settles for a place among the Top 32 - 64. The only outliers to that scheme so far were Liang Wenbo (which took years upon years!) and Ding Junui (which happened over night, and who is argueably the best non-GB player to ever lift a cue, potentially the only player to challenge Selby as most dominant player in the next five years).

    Hence: I do seriously not know. Also, the same can be applied with less favourable adjectives for both Li Hang and Lyu Haotian.


    Jack Lisowski

    This player has been around the circuit for as long as Judd Trump has, and his name is tied to the Top 16 veteran for some reasons: they were flatmates, close friends and were once considered as the next-gen to look out for, only opposition both might have faced could've been Kyren Wilson (too bad), Michael White and Luca Brecel (no professional environment). Then Lisowski suffered from cancer and his snooker suffered, understandably tho.

    Last year Lisowski finally broke free of his status as random Top32 player and really started to fight and show his full talent over and over again, only held back by his lack of experience. Seeing how long it took Trump to get rid of his overboarding emotions and seeing how Lisowski gets defeated by his own mental state too often, this might be key - he is argueably one of the players worth to consider, but: can he overcome that final flaw?

    David Gilbert, Tom Ford, Michael Holt

    For some reason I'd place this trio in the same skill region. Similar to Ryan Day this trio is infamous for talent that does not translate into trophies. At all. While it really just was a question for Day, this trio never seemed to be able to actually come close to finals, which Day at least reached regularly. Yet, this trio is also known to regularly stomp the competition for three days straight, only to slump again - including all kind of bonus breaks, any of these three can easily pump in a maximum and a couple of centuries within just one hour, white washing the strongest players, only to be mentally away from the table a minute afterwards. In the past years either Holt and Gilbert were nice additions, this year: I don't know. The point scheme is just too crazy.
    Zitat Zitat von Annihilator Beitrag anzeigen
    Was macht Gecko da aus meiner BWCL. https://i.imgur.com/Dnql4wd.gif

  12. #12
    StarCraft: Brood War Benutzerbild von DonGeckone
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    Finalized Player List + Player Profiles: The Zeroes

    As the Q-School finished and the first amateur tour is over, the list of professional players is done. First off, the winners aren't too surprising, the only name not covered in the thread so far is: Brandon Sargeant. I actually have never seen him play anywhere, but judging from the previous results, Sargeant always was one of the strongest amateurs out there, as he regularly came close or even qualified for the final stages of the PTC tours, where he often only could appear once he got rid of the kind of players that eventually gained a tour card. I don't have high hopes in him, however. The skill is just too insane to expect him to settle for a crazy record straight away.

    Meanwhile, some really notable names seemed to have missed the qualification altogether. Most surprising: Mitchell Mann and David Grace, who both regularly qualified for the Ro16 of PTCs and big tournaments. I really didn't see them dropping out two years ago and it still baffles me, how the likes of Mr. Highfield made the cut.


    Ben Woollaston

    Woollaston, the most hated player by Endrox, is one of the players you should have a look at if you want to include a 0-pointer into the pro-team. He usually does well and rarely loses in the first round. He also never scores too high, but he gathers a couple of centuries and probably takes some white wash points. Yet, I don't see him go over 15 points in the season overall, at least I don't expect him to.

    Mark Davis

    Mark Davis is just the impersonation of the term "veteran". He was everywhere a professional could have been, yet he never was good enough to lift a title. He is also a player to rarely lose in the first round and deals out a lot of white washes on his way through the tournaments. Especially in minor an wonky tours like the 6-reds and the Champion's League, he might do well. This is the problem: his up and downs are too frequent to place him correctly. Theoretically he could score up to 40 points or stay somewhere around 10.

    Jamie Jones / Gary Wilson

    Jamie Jones, one of the best Welsh Players, constantly travels in between Top 20 and Top 64, each season is a Schrödinger's box when it comes to this player. He is very capable to gather every bonus point and I'm very confident he'll reach at least one quarter final in the upcoming season. However, there's no way of knowing if it'll be a one trick pony or a frequent scorer. Probably the latter, but who knows?

    The same applies to Wilson, he is not a really great player, but he isn't really bad either. In the last two years his form improved a lot. It might be one of the players that makes a name for himself in the next season by reaching the Top32 in every tournament, which in itself might be worth a lot of points. At the same time, he is also very likely to lose here and there to a couple of no-names, just because... he's not that experienced. About as risky as a Jamie Jones pick tbh.

    Un-Nooh, Ebdon, Doherty

    Three players, three regular names placed surprisingly low on the ranking list. All three are veterans, the latter duo has a world title. The difference in between the three:

    Un-Nooh has a 50% shit-season, it's just like that. Then, 30% of mediocre tournaments follow, in which he reaches either Ro32 or Ro16, then it's over. However, in the rest he scores centuries, deals white washes and scores the occasional maximum or fails on the black. He might be a very sound investment if he has a good season.

    Ebdon: Rarely fails in the first round, is known to beat the elite class on occastion and is literally the worst and hard counter to a great many of players, due to his unnervingly slow and methodical play. In formats like the Shoot Out, 6 Reds and the Champions League he just might collect an insane number of points.

    Doherty: He is free from any kind of expectation, after he dropped out of the tour in April 2016. Yet, he came back and almost immediately entered the Top 64 with 0 ranking points to start out with. In comparison: This almost puts him in the Top32 of the one-year-list. Holy crap. Doherty just might win a title if he pulls a Mark Williams next season. The downside: While I don't see him failing too hard, I don't see him dealing many white washes and most certainly too few centuries to really add him over other players.

    Long Shots: McManus, Selt

    McManus and Selt are both long shots for the same reason: They have the experience, skill and endurance of the elite class and both were part of the elite class for more than a season. I don't really know why this duo is so low on the ranking list, but it appears it has been more than two years both showed any sign of life. Yet, if you pick them before they eventually have a good year, you might just score a lot of points. These guys really can take down anyone if motivated and in form, as shown in 2016, when McManus even reached the WC Semis.
    Zitat Zitat von Annihilator Beitrag anzeigen
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  13. #13
    StarCraft: Brood War Benutzerbild von DonGeckone
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    Judd Trump 10
    Kyren Wilson 8
    Barry Hawkins 6
    Stephen Maguire 6
    Thepchaiya Un-Nooh 0




    Neil Robertson 9
    Graeme Dott 6
    Matthew Bolton 0



    Process:

    o'Sullivan isn't any sound investment for 16 points. Even if he was cheaper, I'd think twice about adding him, as one can never be sure if he actually plays in all arenas and reproduces his best form.
    MJW is a sound investment, just not for the price.
    Selby is a very, very interesting choice. I expect him to get at least two new trophies this year, as well as handing out several white washes and scoring up to 50 century breaks. An average of 80 points is in the cards, but the question remains, will he score more?

    The most interesting picks would be John Higgins and Judd Trump, as both can be expected to score around 90+ points. Both are highly reliable. Trump > Higgins in this case, as Trump is cheaper.

    Any player in the 10 point range other than those two is probably not worth it. The first player that comes to mind to pick is Kyren Wilson with 8 points. He's still cheap, as I expect him to score at least 60 points. Leaves me with 12 points to spend.

    From the 8 pointers, Hawkins seems like the most sensible pick, as he also is reliable, plays every arena and starts with a WC boost in his pocket. I expect another 50 certain points from him.

    Stephen Maguire will have a good season, but he won't win anything. Doesn't matter, he is a guy to snatch bonus points, whereas his opposition in the 6-point range doesn't do that - e.g. Bingham is likely to snatch a trophy and deal some serious damage on his way, just not that frequent. I expect another 50 points coming from the Scot for certain, with a lot of room to the top.

    I already posted something about the 0-point players, there are a couple of nice picks. Davis and Yuelong both were tempting, but browsing through their more recent games, something became clear: Aside from going nuts in a selected non-main tour (Yuelong in Championship, Davis in Shoot-Out), both aren't that constant.
    Un-Nooh on the other hand is somewhat forced to at least march through one middle- to major ranked tour, else he might face to drop out of the Top64 soon. I therefore suspect he will train more. He also compensates any early drop outs by stomping players from time to time, as well as scoring a ton of high breaks, especially in the qualifiers. He's a guy I expect to get a lot of bonus points. However, more than 15 points overall would be a giant surprise.

    As for the anti-team goes: I first thought of Ding Junhui, not because he is bad or will do badly, simply due to the fact he doesn't enter a lot of tours. Especially the bonus point nightmare that is the Championship league and random events like the Shoot out will go without him, as well as a couple of minor tours, that are known for upsets. So... he'd be really great to have in the anti team.

    The second player would be Neil Robertson for similar reasons, he is known to not participate in a lot of random junk, like the Shoot Out or potentially the Six Reds. In addition, he seems to struggle to maintain a constant form throughout an entire season.

    The choice between the two came down to the question who to pair them up with: A lot of the four pointers are more scary, whereas Dott being worth 6 points seemed like another logical pick. Dott does very, very well, but he doesn't score any white washes like other players in his range, the same way I don't suspect him to score more than 30 centuries in the entire season.

    Matthew Bolton seemed like a good pick, as he frequently plays the qualifiers, but rarely wins. Dunham would be my first choice, but currently he isn't listed in the WorldSnooker Rankings, so...
    Zitat Zitat von Annihilator Beitrag anzeigen
    Was macht Gecko da aus meiner BWCL. https://i.imgur.com/Dnql4wd.gif

  14. #14
    Tippspielmeister Snooker Fantasy 2015
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    What a shame.

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